Category Archives: Leadership

Schools Gear Up With Mission and Vision Statements

StudentsGear Up With Mission and Vision Statements

Attracting students to public, private or college campuses has become a competitive marketplace. Business strategies in defining direction and purpose can now be found in schools ranging from kindergarten through graduate program school mission statements and vision statements.

Parents and students benefit from this effort with aligning their needs to the school’s focus and defined statements.  A public school in Hampton, New York states their mission “to be committed to providing opportunities for educational growth that empowers students to become responsible and productive members of society.”

Another school’s mission statement recognizes the need for a safe environment.  The American Canyon Middle School, a California Distinguished School, states its focus “that all staff, students and their families have the responsibility to help each individual realize their optimum academic and social potential in a safe, respectful and widely diverse learning community.”

These examples are benefit driven enabling good decision making.  “Today’s business climate demands the same focused structure to succeed” writes Don Midgett, author of “Mission and Vision Statements: Your Path to a Successful Business Future.  Any effort put into creating a Mission and Vision Statement, ultimately when used properly, will lead to clear and effective strategic planning.”

Whether it be offering an educational experience or building and sustaining a business, the foundation of having a mission statement and vision statement will provide flexibility in developing vision-driven change rather than problem-driven change.  Colleagues or employees are able to continue to achieve when market fluctuations occur.

Exactly like parents and students who are considering schools, businesses have successfully attracted and maintained employees who have aligned themselves with the company’s mission and purpose and their planned vision for the future.

Mission and vision statements have a lot of power.  Discover and develop your mission statement and vision statement right away.  You will find that there is an opportunity to use your mission statement and be inspired by your vision statement in every aspect of one’s business or personal life.  Integrate your mission and vision statements with passion and it will be your legacy.  Need help with your mission and vision statements?  Please go to www.missionvisionstatement.com now to receive additional information.

Economic Tip: Mission and Vision Statements Can Re-Energize Your Business

247516072475160720120331_0038_successMission and Vision Statements Can Re-Energize Your Business

The economic tip of today’s time seems to be survival! Many businesses are looking for answers to re-energize and deal successfully in the current economic climate. All the planning, capital, marketing and organizational decisions seem outside the realm of what was “business as normal.” Do not panic. Resist the urge for a complete overhaul. Begin with what you have accomplished such as your business mission and vision statements and seek to re-energize your focus within the current business reality.

Your business mission statement states why your business exists. It enables you to effectively communicate the “why” to your employees and to your marketplace. This is where the review should begin. Because strategic business decisions stem from your mission statement, it is not only good to review the statement but also to test it.  Here are a few key questions to help:

1. Does your mission statement adequately address your business strengths and expertise?
2.  Have you retained the values your business shares in common with others in your line of  business? Emphasis on good customer service for example is an important element for long term success.
3. Is your market the same as when you first began? If not, you may need to adjust the change in your mission statement or vision statement.

Remember to keep all your audiences in mind, including employees, shareholders, family members, customers, suppliers and your community.  A business or organizational mission and purpose that support all these audiences will retain the most solid relationships.

The most important objective in the vision for your business future is the desire to achieve your mission, with clarity, commitment and communication. An example of an effective direct sales business owner is:

“We will be a global network of independent wellness consultants helping people physically and financially. We will be a positive example to our team, prospects and customers. We will focus on expanding and training our team and having them duplicate these efforts to create a fun and rewarding business.” This statement personifies a business who will manage out of a sense of vision, not out of a sense of desperation.

Here are a few key tips to help you revamp or redefine your mission statement or vision statement:

1. Re-examine what sets you apart from your competitors.
2. If someone contacted you about what seemed like a reasonable opportunity, are your statements specific enough to give you a business-oriented reason to accept or reject that opportunity and explain the reasoning for the acceptance or rejection – based on your mission and vision statements?
3. Do your statements guide you toward an ideal customer?
4. Do your statements help the company avoid seeking to be all things to all people?

These tips can begin the process of re-energizing your business with confidence and give you more consciously focused mission and vision statements. This will help enable your business to not only survive but to grow in the years ahead.

For additional help with your mission statement and vision statement or if you need to
develop your mission and vision statements, go to www.missionvisionstatement.com
now.

Embracing Change with Mission and Vision Statements

L. Gordon Cravitz, publisher of the Wall Street Journal, wrote in a New Year’s column (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 2, 2007) that this icon of business, markets and journalism had faced a dilemma. “Do we preserve the icon as it has been, rejecting changes as too risky?  Or do we try to add to the qualities that created the icon in the first place, taking care not to change simply for the sake of change?”  They would adopt the latter approach defining and involving its readership in the evolving changes. e_learning

It takes time and work for your mission and vision statements to become living expressions of the company’s behavior.  You must be willing to test your Mission and Vision statements for their timeliness and consistency of values. When working with colleagues, explain how you arrived at your vision, so they may understand the logic behind your statements and their role and place in the future. You may also include customers, suppliers etc.

Businesses that review and update their statements from time to time remain energized and in the forefront of their marketplace.  They avoid being outmoded, outdated and lacking vision in changes to their business environment.  Your mission and vision statements focus your business in terms of direction, leadership, goal-setting and much more.  “Your statements should serve as the basis for your strategic plans and actions.

To learn more about effective Mission and Vision Statements and for a complete step-by-step guide to develop your statements, go to www.missionvisionstatement.com and order Mission and Vision Statements: Your Path To A Successful Business Future.  This seminar and workshop in an e-book covers:

  • what you should know before creating your business mission and vision
  • exercises to develop your mission and vision statements
  • how to test-drive and live your mission and vision.

Revamp Your Mission and Vision Statement with These Easy to Use Tips

Revamp Your Mission and Vision Statement

Here are a few key tips to help you revamp or redefine your mission and vision statements:247516072475160720120331_0038_success

1. Re-examine what sets you apart from your competitors.

2. If someone contacted you about what seemed like a reasonable opportunity, are your statements specific enough to give you a business-oriented reason to accept or reject that opportunity and explain the reasoning for the acceptance or rejection – based on your mission and vision statements?

3. Do your statements guide you toward an ideal customer?

4. Do your statements help the company avoid seeking to be all things to all people?

These tips can begin the process of re-energizing your business with confidence and give you more consciously focused mission and vision statements. This will help enable your business to not only survive but to grow in the years ahead.  For additional help with your mission statement and vision statement or if you need to develop your mission and vision statements, go to www.missionvisionstatement.com now.

 

Champions Don’t Become Champions in the Ring

Teddy Roosevelt once said “Champions don’t become champions in the ring – they are merely recognized there.”  How true.  The process required for a person or business to joggingbreak free from the average takes place long before the recognition of the” champion in the ring”.  That process begins with understanding the passion or entrepreneurship in oneself or business.  Understanding the why becomes the basis for the mission or mission statement.  How will you serve in service or product? What purpose do you fill in your community or marketplace?  Answering these questions and being able to define your mission to partners, employees etc. become the foundation of successful decision making, focus and ultimately right strategic actions.

As your mission statement is your starting point, your vision statement for yourself or business becomes your destination – it is here that the “separation from the pack” begins.

Your vision statement articulates clearly the desired future for your business.  It provides direction, aligns key players and energizes people to achieve a common purpose.  When your employees, associates, etc understand and share in the future of the business, the actions become clear as to how to reach it.  It also guides the decision process to reflect the statements in staying the course.

Viewing the process of defining your mission and vision statements as a priority instead of an afterthought, communicating and defining your future instead of reacting to outside influences, creating strategic planning and follow-through creates the foundation needed for a successful business or champion in the marketplace.

Need help with your mission and vision statements?  Then go to www.missionvisionstatement.com where you will find leadership e-tools to help you be a champion!

Top 10 Quotes of Zig Ziglar

Zig Ziglar, famed motivational speaker and prolific author died last year but many of his famous quips and quotes will remain popular long into the future.  Zig Ziglar cultivated a devoted following by saying success hinges upon attitude and motivation. motivated

I have put my favorite top ten quotes and truisms of Zig Ziglar’s together – they are all ideal to review as we enter the start of a New Year:

  • “There are no traffic jams on the extra mile.”
  • “Lack of direction, not lack of time, is the problem. We all have twenty-four hour days.”
  • “You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great.”
  • “If you can dream it, you can achieve it.”
  • “Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.”
  • “A goal properly set is halfway reached”
  • “People often say motivation doesn’t last; neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.”
  • “You will get all you want in life, if you help enough other people get what they want.”
  • “Remember that failure is an event, not a person.”

Best wishes to you in 2013!

For help with creating or updating your mission statement and vision statement go to http://missionvisionstatement.com/ now.  There you will find case studies, articles, testimonials and products to help you with mission and vision statements and how to use them for the best benefit and achieve your maximum results.

Pointing Fingers: Government vs. NASA

247646852476468520120519_0035_arrows_businessWe know that pointing fingers is not uncommon in government but in a recent article in the Washington Post (12.6.2012) ”Whither NASA?: Agency’s strategy, mission and vision lack clarity, expert panel finds” the administration, Congress and NASA could all point to each other.

Two years ago, President Obama announced at Cape Canaveral, Florida that a manned mission to an asteroid by 2025 would be among one of NASA’s goals. However, the National Research Council who was assigned to report by NASA at the request of Congress found little effort to initiate the asteroid mission and more telling, assessed the agency’s mission and vision statements to be generic and could “apply to almost any government research and development agency.” The report further stated that the agency’s strategic objectives were vague on details and “of little value from the perspective of establishing clear and unifying strategic directions for NASA.

NRC Committee chairman, Albert Carnesale stated that in terms of human space flight it was unclear whether the priority was an asteroid, the moon or Mars. “If you look at what the administration says and look at what Congress says and look at the strategic plan” said Carnesale, “It is not clear what the priorities are.” The article reported that the committee determined that the agency, without that guidance “cannot reasonably be expected” to put together an effective strategy.

NASA needs to revisit their mission and vision statements and update them to reflect on a more focused future – one that is agreed upon by this Country’s leadership.  A splintered approach will not be achievable, especially in light of today’s budgetary constraints.  It is important for NASA to update their mission statement and vision statement in order to reflect a more focused future.  If you need help with revisiting and updating your mission and vision statements, go to www.missionvisionstatement.com now.

Smart Company Mission and Vision Statements Equal Smart Workplaces

Smart companies retain talented employees maintains Don Midgett, author of Mission and Vision Statements: Your Path to a Successful Business Future.  Just look at the list in Fortune Magazine’s list of Best Companies to Work For.  The list is compiled from 247190672471906720111001_k0006_skyscraper_0150_finalemployee surveys.  You don’t get that return on employee loyalty or well being without a company foundation of communicated, intelligent   business mission and vision statements.

In a climate of national uncertainty in the workplace, the list of top companies reveals their astuteness in first hiring those that agree with and further the company mission and vision. All the perks in the marketplace cannot replace the integrity and hard work of an employee whose talent and workplace desire is to be a part of something worthy.  Secondly, comments suggest that the companies also waste no time in recognizing their employees’ contribution to that end: whether it be quality child care, free espresso or lunches, healthcare, generous pay or bonus, to company commitment to social work.

Can you imagine your company and its employees saving and securing its future as number seven on Fortune’s list? Camden Property Trust did. The Houston-based apartment management firm’s employees pitched in to trim $6million in costs by reducing pay and reworking contracts in order to work through the recession. It has been done by both large and small businesses. It is the highest compliment to the intention or mission and vision of the company and its employees. If your answer was yes, you are a smart company. If your answer is uncertain, you can change that by reevaluating your basic focus.

It does not matter what the size or nature of your business writes Midgett; the focus, clarity and power of your mission and vision statements communicated and actualized by your company and its employees equals a successful, happy and smart workplace. To help you develop or update your organization or company’s mission and vision statements and smarten your workplace, go to www.missionvisionstatement.com now. There you will find articles, case studies, examples and more.

Leadership – A Passion for Vision Statements

visionary image aThe only kind of leadership worth following is based on vision writes Don Midgett, author of Mission and Vision Statements: Your Path to a Successful Business Future.  For a business to succeed in the unpredictable and competitive 21st century it’s important to have leaders with vision; leaders are responsible for what happens in the future. It is in their leadership that they will develop a vision statement which serves as the heart of any size company—from the self-employed to a department of a multi-tiered organizational conglomerate.

Todd Buchholtz, in New Ideas from Dead CEOs: Lasting Lessons from the Corner Office writes of the experiences of the most revered business leaders of the 20th century; their ups and downs, effects on their given industries and their relationship to modern day management practices.  The singular characteristic present in his choices was their passion for something newly created, either in product or way of business.  It was their passion to create something new “to excel in their chosen industry behind something they fervently believed in” above a need for wealth or power.  They, like other visionaries, understood their mission and desired future or vision for their company.

A businessman named Fred Smith had an idea to deliver important documents over night.  He imagined airplanes from all over the country flying in to a central hub city after midnight, sorting their cargoes and flying off.  He named his business Federal Express, Fed-Ex for short.  His vision statement: “A vision of truly reliable mail service.”

For Steve Jobs, of Apple Computer it was to “start a revolution in the way the average person processes information.”  With the successful Nordstrom family it was to “create an experience with our stores”

“It is the business visionary who, having focused his passion on the mission of his business and created a mission statement, then seeks to formulate and implement his desired future with a clearly stated vision statement.  This is followed by effective communication, clarity and commitment, to both his management team and employees,” said Midgett.  It is very important for leadership to have a mission statement that clearly defines one’s purpose, as well as a vision statement that unmistakably defines the company’s desired future.

For additional information on the importance of mission and vision statements to leadership and tools to help anyone better understand mission and vision statements and how to use them effectively, go to www.missionvisionstatement.com/leadership now.

Take Your Mission to the Street

Have you heard about the television program that features CEOs who go undercover to experience their own companies, employees, and market practices?  It was actually 246783082467830820100116_kochi_0052_finalpremiered on Oprah in February 2010.  It was compelling.  A couple of CEOs that were definite good guys  found their employees working long hard hours, sometimes with misunderstood policies or glaring shortcomings by company management.

Such an exercise certainly must result in a re-alignment of the company or business mission and vision statement on all levels-beginning with the owner, leader or CEO.  Properly written and updated, the company mission and vision reflects the ability to hit the street or marketplace at any given time.

On Oprah’s program, the employees featured had great attitudes in spite of their job descriptions and actual duties. Their years of employment also gave them an edge on a better understanding and efficiencies of the operations, which management lacked.  Going back to square one is not the answer, but a serious review of  mission and vision statements involving tiered employees and management (communicated) throughout the company is just good sense.

The facility to take your mission to the street means you do not burden your business with a purpose and direction for its future so vast that it begins to intimidate.  Explain in detail how you arrived at the statements, so colleagues and employees can understand the logic behind your statements and more importantly, their role and place in the journey.  Get leaders and key contributors in your business to look at the implications of the mission statement and vision statement for their areas of responsibility.

On-target mission and vision statements become workable and accurate guides for strategic and long-range planning as well as day-to-day operations.   Understand that the reviewed mission or vision does not always have an effect right away – it takes time to change old ways of thinking and doing things.

Be sure your mission and vision statements are on target for your customers, staff and owners.  For help with creating or updating your mission statement and vision statement go to http://missionvisionstatement.com/ now.  There you will find case studies, articles, testimonials and products to help you with mission and vision statements and how to use them for the best benefit and achieve your maximum results.